Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Mr. Barber is absent

BLUE DAY Careers & Academies 7 - PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH THE PARTIALLY BUILD STOOLS, HARDWARE OR TOOLS! Sit near the big screen on the couches and get down the “short chairs" to put in a semi-circle.
If it's Thursday, you MAY have Mr. Moxham visiting to show off Music Industry/Technology. Make me proud!
OR
  • If he does NOT show, you are working on your catapult research on your google doc.  
  • Share a Google Doc with your group and Mr. B
  • Today you NEED to have your full names, and the name of your catapult group- this should be the title of your Google Doc
  • You also need to have links copied/pasted that will take me to pics, videos, or how to websites
  • No one may go in the wood shop or the offices when I have a sub.


BLUE DAY Engineering Technology 7- PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH THE PARTIALLY BUILD STOOLS, HARDWARE OR TOOLS! Sit near the big screen on the couches and “short chairs.” If you can help my substitute project the video onto the screen and turn on my construction speaker, please do.
  1. Get a piece of copy paper and something to write with (you can borrow a clipboard if you put it back). Fold your sheet in half and put your full name at the top on the front.  I need to be able to read it.
  2. Find the TED Talk below that you are most interested in.
  3. As you watch/listen to your TED talk, draw, sketch, and doodle on the top half.
  4. When you hear an interesting, difficult, or extremely complicated word, list it on the bottom half. You need to circle the 3 best words by the end that you think are amazing and more importantly that you think no one else has. I need to be able to read your 3 words.
  5. Finally, tell me one awesome thing that you learned from the talk.
You will get 6 points for the sketch, a point for each original and awesome word and a point for your sentence about the awesome thing.
  1. Nick Bostrom: What happens when our computers get smarter than we are? (16:31) With a background in physics, computational neuroscience, mathematical logic and philosophy, Nick Bostrom is a philosophy professor at Oxford University and author of the book Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies. He is also the founding director of the Future of Humanity Institute, a multidisciplinary research center that drives mathematicians, philosophers and scientists to investigate the human condition and its future. This metaphyshical discussion, reminiscent of a college philosophy course, explores how older A.I., programmed by code, has evolved into active machine learning. "Rather than handcrafting knowledge representations and features," Bostrom says, "we create algorithms that learn from raw perceptual data." In other words, machines can learn in the same ways that children do. Bostrom theorizes that A.I. will be the last invention that humanity will need to make, and eventually machines will be better at inventing than humans -- which may leave us at their mercy as they decide what to invent next. A solution to control A.I., he suggests, is to make sure it shares human values rather than serving only itself (cue James Cameron's Terminator franchise). https://youtu.be/MnT1xgZgkpk
  2. "Have Broad Axe Will Travel" - Roy Underhill- TEDxRaleigh 2011 (18:03) Roy Underhill, craftsmen, legend, and Woodwright Shoppe Director, swings an ax sharing that ingenuity and living in the present is the killer app of the future.  https://youtu.be/Au1TbIyLcPU
  3. TEDxKids@Brussels - Gever Tulley - Tinkering School (17:21) A software engineer, Gever Tulley is the co-founder of the Tinkering School, a week-long camp where lucky kids get to play with their very own power tools. He's interested in helping kids learn how to build, solve problems, use new materials and hack old ones for new purposes. He's also a certified paragliding instructor. https://youtu.be/GU-Kbyk2eDg


BLUE DAY Programming and Coding 6- PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH THE PARTIALLY BUILD STOOLS, HARDWARE OR TOOLS! Sit near the big screen on the couches and “short chairs.”
  1. Keep following people from the class and uploading Scratch Cards (don’t forget directions and special thanks when you do it)
Or
  1. Get a piece of copy paper and something to write with (you can borrow a clipboard if you put it back). Fold your sheet in half and put your full name at the top on the front.  I need to be able to read it.
  2. Find the TED Talk below that you are most interested in.
  3. As you watch/listen to your TED talk, draw, sketch, and doodle on the top half.
  4. When you hear an interesting, difficult, or extremely complicated word, list it on the bottom half. You need to circle the 3 best words by the end that you think are amazing and more importantly that you think no one else has. I need to be able to read your 3 words.
  5. Finally, tell me one awesome thing that you learned from the talk.
You will get 6 points for the sketch, a point for each original and awesome word and a point for your sentence about the awesome thing.
  1. Kenneth Cukier: Big data is better data (15:55) As data editor for The Economist and coauthor of Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think, Kenneth Cukier has spent years immersed in big data, machine learning and the impact both have had on society. "More data doesn't just let us see more," he says in his talk. "More data allows us to see new. It allows us to see better. It allows us to see different." The heart of Cukier's talk focuses on machine learning algorithms, from voice recognition and self-driving cars to identifying the most common signs of breast cancer, all of which are made possible by a mind-boggling amount of data. But along with his clear enthusiasm for big data and intelligent machines, he sounds a note of caution: "In the big data age, the challenge will be safeguarding free will, moral choice, human volition, human agency." Like fire, he says, big data is a powerful tool -- one that, if we're not careful, will burn us. https://youtu.be/8pHzROP1D-w
  2. Rana el Kaliouby: This app knows how you feel — from the look on your face (11:05)Technology has been blamed for lessening social and emotional connections among millennials, but what if it could sense emotion? In this talk, computer scientist Rana el Kaliouby, cofounder and chief strategy & science officer of Affectiva, outlines her work designing algorithms for an application used on mobile phones, tablets and computers that can read people's faces and recognize positive and negative emotions.  What good is that? el Kaliouby gives a few examples: Wearable glasses armed with emotion-sensing software could help autistic children or the visually impaired recognize particular emotions in others. A learning app could sense that the learner is confused or bored, and slow down or speed up accordingly. A car could sense a driver's fatigue and send an alert. "By humanizing technology," el Kaliouby concludes, "we have this golden opportunity to reimagine how we connect with machines, and therefore how we, as human beings, connect with one another." https://youtu.be/o3VwYIazybI
  3. Jeremy Howard: The wonderful and terrifying implications of computers that can learn (19:46) Jeremy Howard, a data scientist, CEO of advanced machine learning firm Enlitic and data science professor at Singularity University, imagines how advanced machine learning can improve our lives. His talk explores deep learning, an approach to enabling computers to teach themselves new information via set algorithms. A bit lengthy but fascinating, Howard's talk outlines different ways computers can teach themselves by "seeing," "hearing" and "reading." https://youtu.be/xx310zM3tLs

BLUE DAY Creative Design 6- PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH THE PARTIALLY BUILD STOOLS, HARDWARE OR TOOLS! Sit near the big screen on the couches and “short chairs.”
  1. Get a piece of copy paper and something to write with (you can borrow a clipboard if you put it back). Fold your sheet in half and put your full name at the top on the front.  I need to be able to read it.
  2. Find the TED Talk below that you are most interested in.
  3. As you watch/listen to your TED talk, draw, sketch, and doodle on the top half.
  4. When you hear an interesting, difficult, or extremely complicated word, list it on the bottom half. You need to circle the 3 best words by the end that you think are amazing and more importantly that you think no one else has. I need to be able to read your 3 words.
  5. Finally, tell me one awesome thing that you learned from the talk.
You will get 6 points for the sketch, a point for each original and awesome word and a point for your sentence about the awesome thing.
  1. Chris Urmson: How a driverless car sees the road (15:29) In this talk, roboticist Chris Urmson cites some of the dangers drivers face -- inclement weather; distractions that include answering phone calls, texting and setting the GPS; flawed, careless drivers -- as well as the staggering amount of time wasted each day by drivers stuck in traffic. The solution? Not surprisingly, Urmson, who has headed up Google's self-driving car project since 2009, says autonomous cars are the answer. Urmson shows how driverless cars see and understand their environment -- the layout of the roads and intersections, other vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists, traffic signs and signals, construction obstacles, special presences such as police and school buses, and so on -- and decide what action to take based on a vast set of behavioral models. It's a fascinating car's-eye look at the world. https://youtu.be/tiwVMrTLUWg
  2. Pia Mancini: How to upgrade democracy for the Internet era (13:28) Argentine democracy activist Pia Mancini hopes to use software to inform voters, provide a platform for public debate and give citizens a voice in government decisions. She helped launch an open-source mobile platform called DemocracyOS that's designed to provide citizens with immediate input into the legislative process. In her talk, Mancini suggests that the 18th-century democratic slogan "No taxation without representation" should be updated to "No taxation without a conversation" for the modern age. She poses the question, "If the Internet is the new printing press, then what is democracy for the Internet era?" Although it took some convincing, Mancini says, the Argentine Congress has agreed to discuss three pieces of legislation with citizens via DemocracyOS, giving those citizens a louder voice in government than they've ever had before. https://youtu.be/NXfYNdapq3Q
  3. "Have Broad Axe Will Travel" - Roy Underhill- TEDxRaleigh 2011 (18:03) Roy Underhill, craftsmen, legend, and Woodwright Shoppe Director, swings an ax sharing that ingenuity and living in the present is the killer app of the future.  https://youtu.be/Au1TbIyLcPU
  4. TEDxKids@Brussels - Gever Tulley - Tinkering School (17:21) A software engineer, Gever Tulley is the co-founder of the Tinkering School, a week-long camp where lucky kids get to play with their very own power tools. He's interested in helping kids learn how to build, solve problems, use new materials and hack old ones for new purposes. He's also a certified paragliding instructor. https://youtu.be/GU-Kbyk2eDg

BLUE DAY Engineer Build 8- PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH THE PARTIALLY BUILD STOOLS, HARDWARE OR TOOLS! Sit near the big screen on the couches and “short chairs.”
  1. Get a piece of copy paper and something to write with (you can borrow a clipboard if you put it back). Fold your sheet in half and put your full name at the top on the front.  I need to be able to read it.
  2. Find the TED Talk below that you are most interested in.
  3. As you watch/listen to your TED talk, draw, sketch, and doodle on the top half.
  4. When you hear an interesting, difficult, or extremely complicated word, list it on the bottom half. You need to circle the 3 best words by the end that you think are amazing and more importantly that you think no one else has. I need to be able to read your 3 words.
  5. Finally, tell me one awesome thing that you learned from the talk.
You will get 6 points for the sketch, a point for each original and awesome word and a point for your sentence about the awesome thing.
  1. Nick Bostrom: What happens when our computers get smarter than we are? (16:31) With a background in physics, computational neuroscience, mathematical logic and philosophy, Nick Bostrom is a philosophy professor at Oxford University and author of the book Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies. He is also the founding director of the Future of Humanity Institute, a multidisciplinary research center that drives mathematicians, philosophers and scientists to investigate the human condition and its future. This metaphyshical discussion, reminiscent of a college philosophy course, explores how older A.I., programmed by code, has evolved into active machine learning. "Rather than handcrafting knowledge representations and features," Bostrom says, "we create algorithms that learn from raw perceptual data." In other words, machines can learn in the same ways that children do. Bostrom theorizes that A.I. will be the last invention that humanity will need to make, and eventually machines will be better at inventing than humans -- which may leave us at their mercy as they decide what to invent next. A solution to control A.I., he suggests, is to make sure it shares human values rather than serving only itself (cue James Cameron's Terminator franchise). https://youtu.be/MnT1xgZgkpk
  2. "Have Broad Axe Will Travel" - Roy Underhill- TEDxRaleigh 2011 (18:03) Roy Underhill, craftsmen, legend, and Woodwright Shoppe Director, swings an ax sharing that ingenuity and living in the present is the killer app of the future.  https://youtu.be/Au1TbIyLcPU
  3. TEDxKids@Brussels - Gever Tulley - Tinkering School (17:21) A software engineer, Gever Tulley is the co-founder of the Tinkering School, a week-long camp where lucky kids get to play with their very own power tools. He's interested in helping kids learn how to build, solve problems, use new materials and hack old ones for new purposes. He's also a certified paragliding instructor. https://youtu.be/GU-Kbyk2eDg

BLUE DAY Mechatronics-PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH THE PARTIALLY BUILD STOOLS, HARDWARE OR TOOLS! Sit near the big screen on the couches and “short chairs.”
  1. Get a piece of copy paper and something to write with (you can borrow a clipboard if you put it back). Fold your sheet in half and put your full name at the top on the front.  I need to be able to read it.
  2. Find the TED Talk below that you are most interested in.
  3. As you watch/listen to your TED talk, draw, sketch, and doodle on the top half.
  4. When you hear an interesting, difficult, or extremely complicated word, list it on the bottom half. You need to circle the 3 best words by the end that you think are amazing and more importantly that you think no one else has. I need to be able to read your 3 words.
  5. Finally, tell me one awesome thing that you learned from the talk.
You will get 6 points for the sketch, a point for each original and awesome word and a point for your sentence about the awesome thing.
Possible TED Talks for Mechatronics:
  1. Hugh Herr: New bionics let us run, climb and dance (19:00) Hugh Herr is a bionics designer at MIT who creates bionic extremities that emulate the function of natural limbs. A double leg amputee, Herr designed his own bionic legs -- the world's first bionic foot and calf system called the BiOM. Herr's inspirational and motivational talk depicts the innovative ways that computer systems can be used in tandem with artificial limbs to create bionic limbs that move and act like flesh and bone. "We want to close the loop between the human and the bionic external limb," he says. The talk closes with a moving performance by ballroom dancer Adrianne Haslet-Davis, who lost her left leg in the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings. She dances beautifully wearing a bionic leg designed by Herr and his colleagues. https://youtu.be/CDsNZJTWw0w
  2. Chris Milk: How virtual reality can create the ultimate empathy machine (10:28) This inspiring talk details how Chris Milk turned from an acclaimed music video director who wanted to tell emotional stories of the human condition into an experiential artist who does the same via virtual reality. He worked with the United Nations to make virtual reality films such as "Clouds Over Sidra," which gives a first-person view of the life of a Syrian refugee living in Jordan, so that U.N. workers can better understand how their actions can impact people's lives around the world. Milk notes, "[Virtual reality] is not a video game peripheral. It connects humans to other humans in a profound way that I've never seen before in any other form of media... It's a machine, but through this machine, we become more compassionate, we become more empathetic, and we become more connected -- and ultimately, we become more human." https://youtu.be/AEeUFZfmyNk
  3. Topher White: What can save the rainforest? Your used cell phone (9:34) Topher White is a conservation technologist who started the Rainforest Connection, which uses recycled cell phones to monitor and protect remote areas of rainforests in real time. His extraordinary talk revolves around his 2011 trip to a Borneo gibbon reserve. He discovered that illegal logging was rampant in the area, but the sounds of animals in the rainforest were so loud that the rangers couldn't hear the chainsaws over the natural cacophony. Resisting the urge to develop an expensive high-tech solution, White turned to everyday cell phones, encased in protective boxes and powered by solar panels. The devices are placed high in the trees and programmed to listen for chainsaws. If a phone hears a chainsaw, it uses the surprisingly good cellular connectivity in the rainforest to send the approximate location to the cell phones of rangers on the ground, who can then stop the illegal logging in the act. Through this means, White's startup has helped stop illegal logging and poaching operations in Sumatra, and the system is being expanded to rainforest reserves in Indonesia, Brazil and Africa. https://youtu.be/xPK2Ch90xWo

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH THE PARTIALLY BUILD STOOLS, HARDWARE OR TOOLS!
At 3:33, please get all the "short chairs" up on a table, but stay out of the "construction zone"

Monday, February 27, 2017

DESIGN BRIEFS


You can copy and paste this for YOUR design brief:
1.Name

2. Product

3. Design Brief

4. For

5. Why Helpful

6. Specifications

7. Screencap

Remember: 
  • 6”x5” means six inches by five inches
  • 16’ means 16 feet
  • 14 mm mean fourteen millimeters … remember it is the same as 1.4 cm or centimeters

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Good place to start! Quick links


***************************

ENGINEERING- Inspiration for your useful CAD?:
SIGNUP HERE for your Useful CAD idea 

or your Screencast-O-Matic "How to"

***************************

6TH GRADE CODING (working on Scratch Card lessons for 8 pts and then tricking them out for 2-3 pts!): https://scratch.mit.edu/pdfs/cards/Scratch2Cards.pdf 

***************************

CAREERS & ACADEMIES

Monday, February 13, 2017

Mr. B is absent on 2/14 in the afternoon


Mr. Barber is absent from 12:15-4:05 (Eye doctor appt)

    Doctor, Eye, Check, Sight, ...
  • No one goes in the wood shop.
  • No one uses the lasercutter or 3D printer.
  • Don’t take a 3d print (or touch any that aren’t yours).
  • Directions are on hoosjon.blogspot.com
  • No 5th block pulls-just go to study hall!





Programming & Coding 6 (12:43-1:24)

  1. Who can help take roll on my Wahoo Sticker Lenovo?
  2. https://scratch.mit.edu/pdfs/cards/Scratch2Cards.pdf
  3. Working on Scratch Cards, save them to your computer and your h:/ drive and have it ready for Mr. B to check on Thursday.

Creative Design 6 (1:26-2:08)

  1. Who can help take roll on my Wahoo Sticker Lenovo?
  2. NAMETAG- exported to my 1BARBERTECHNOLOGYFILE and ready to 3d print on Thursday
  3. SCREENCAST TEST- need 3 things- webcam, sound of your voice and moving something on 123d Design
  4. SIGNUP- Signed up for Screencasting a skill on my Wahoo Sticker Lenovo?
  5. SCREENCASTING ON YOUR LENOVO- Now screencast that skill and save it!
  6. USEFUL CAD- Working on what we will 3d print that is useful to others

Engineer Build 8 (2:11-2:52)

  1. Who can help take roll on my Wahoo Sticker Lenovo?
  2. NAMETAG- exported to my 1BARBERTECHNOLOGYFILE and ready to 3d print on Thursday
  3. SCREENCAST TEST- need 3 things- webcam, sound of your voice and moving something on 123d Design
  4. SIGNUP- Signed up for Screencasting a skill on my Wahoo Sticker Lenovo?
  5. SCREENCASTING ON YOUR LENOVO- Now screencast that skill and save it!
  6. USEFUL CAD- Working on what we will 3d print that is useful to others

Mechatronics-HS (2:54-3:36)

  1. Who can help take roll on my Wahoo Sticker Lenovo?
  2. Go to GOOGLE DRIVE and create a Google Slideshow
    1. Slide one is the title slide with name of your controller and your name (if you worked with someone, put their name in parentheses below yours)
    2. Slide two is your before pic of you building the controller
    3. Slide three is your screen cap of your game.  Include how you access this game ... include the URL if that's how to get to it.
    4. Slide four is the close up of your controller
    5. Slide five is the pic of you playing your game
    6. Slide six is the table/comic strip with all 4 pics
    7. Slide seven- Answer the question "Why does this controller work?" (Like what is happening so the MaKey MaKey can work for your game?)
    8. Slide eight- Answer the question, "What did I learn from this project?"
  3. Make sure you cleanup up at 3:33 and stack all chairs before leaving at the bell!

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

12/2 Field Trip-Sub Plans

Mr. B is away on a Field Trip, so no woodshop or tools today.

GoldEngineerBuild8 (9:53-10:35)
Gold Eng/Tech 7 (10:38-11:20 … there is no bell at either time)

  1. Please open up hoosjon.blogspot.com on one tab and Google Drive on another.
  2. On Google Drive, click on the  blue New button and select Google Docs.
  3. Before you type ANYTHING, click on Share, name your Google Doc with your username and the word Reflection (ex. jwb2f Reflection) and share it with jbarber@k12albemarle.org.
  4. You can copy and paste the black questions below on the doc before responding to them.

So far, this year, we’ve done 2 big units and you’re going to tell me about each part:

123d Design (CADding for the 3d printer, screenshotting your project, putting it on a slide)
When using AutoDesk 123d Design ...
  1. What did you make?
I CADded
  1. What was the easiest part?
The easiest part was

  1. What was the hardest part?
The part that gave me the most trouble was
  1. Did you make it through and figure out the hardest part?
Even though it gave me trouble, I was able to

Or
I never got past the hard part, but

Or
I wish I could’ve figured it out, because my CAD ended up

  1. Why do you think we CAD in my Engineering Class?
I think we CAD in Mr. Barber’s room because

  1. What could Mr. Barber have done better in this unit? How could it be more helpful for your learning?
I wish that


Doghouse (Planning the doghouse, reading the plans, MEASURING/marking lines, cutting with a chop saw and a Skil saw, screws, jig saw for the doorway)

  1. What was the easiest part?
The easiest part of making a doghouse is

  1. What was the hardest part?
The part that gave me the most trouble was

  1. Did you make it through and figure out the hardest part?
Even though it gave me trouble, we were able to

Or
I never got past the hard part, but

Or
I wish I could’ve figured it out, because our doghouse currently looks

  1. Why do you think we build doghouses in Engineering Class? (2 answers in one sentence)
I think we build doghouses in Mr. Barber’s room because

and it also

  1. What could Mr. Barber have done better in this unit? How could it be more helpful for your learning?
I wish that

FINALLY, go back and erase all of my questions and leave your sentences there.  Did you capitalize?  Is there punctuation? Does everything make sense?  If you have time, add any pics that you can, either from a screenshot or from using the camera on your laptop and add it to your google doc.

Gold Careers & Academies7 (10:38-11:20)
  • All students should be with me on the trip.  If not, they need to check student portal and see what they can do to improve their grade.


GoldProg&Coding 6 (12:43-1:24)
  • Go to scratch.mit.edu and finish doing your 3 day joke! Next class will be Hour of Code!

GoldCreativeDesign6  (12:43-1:24)
  1. Please open up hoosjon.blogspot.com on one tab and Google Drive on another.
  2. On Google Drive, click on the  blue New button and select Google Docs.
  3. Before you type ANYTHING, click on Share, name your Google Doc with your username and the word Reflection (ex. jwb2f Reflection) and share it with jbarber@k12albemarle.org.
  4. You can copy and paste the black questions below on the doc before responding to them.

So far, this year, we’ve done 2 ½  big units and you’re going to tell me about each part:

123d Design (CADding for the 3d printer, screenshotting your project, putting it on a slide)
When using AutoDesk 123d Design ...
  1. What did you make?
I CADded
  1. What was the easiest part?
The easiest part was

  1. What was the hardest part?
The part that gave me the most trouble was
  1. Did you make it through and figure out the hardest part?
Even though it gave me trouble, I was able to

Or
I never got past the hard part, but

Or
I wish I could’ve figured it out, because my CAD ended up

  1. Why do you think we CAD in my Engineering Class?
I think we CAD in Mr. Barber’s room because

  1. What could Mr. Barber have done better in this unit? How could it be more helpful for your learning?
I wish that


Lasercutting (Downloading Adobe Illustrator, setting up your page so that it will work, tracing logos/regions or states, cutting with the lasercutter, 2nd design- was it easier the 2nd time around)

  1. What was the easiest part?
The easiest part of making a doghouse is

  1. What was the hardest part?
The part that gave me the most trouble was

  1. Did you make it through and figure out the hardest part?
Even though it gave me trouble, I was able to

Or
I never got past the hard part, but

Or
I wish I could’ve figured it out, because it currently

  1. Why do you think we lasercut in Engineering Class? (2 answers in one sentence)
I think we lasercut in Mr. Barber’s room because

and it also

  1. What could Mr. Barber have done better in this unit? How could it be more helpful for your learning?
I wish that

FINALLY, go back and erase all of my questions and leave your sentences there.  Did you capitalize?  Is there punctuation? Does everything make sense?  If you have time, add any pics that you can, either from a screenshot or from using the camera on your laptop and add it to your google doc.